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What can I do?

It's true that large systemic changes are needed to make an impact significant enough to get Leeds to carbon zero by the 2030s. However, there is still lots you can do as an individual and in your local area to take meaningful action.

Every little action counts, but coming together to plan and act for climate justice in a joined-up way is much more effective.

 

The key is to 'think big, act small, and start now'.

1

Learn more about climate impacts

Get yourself clued up about the climate emergency and the enormous impact that increased levels of carbon in our atmosphere, through the burning of fossil fuels, are having on our planet.

 

A 'carbon footprint' indicates how much carbon is produced by people, products, and processes in everyday life. The bigger a carbon footprint is, the worse its impact is on the environment. 

 

Use WWF’s carbon footprint calculator to find out more about yours and how you can reduce it.

There has been criticism about the way the term 'carbon footprint' came about and a debate as to whether this was used as a tool to shift attention from fossil fuel-extracting companies onto ordinary people.

 

Feed your curiosity by learning more about climate change and climate justice. Equip yourself with knowledge to act in the planet's best interest. Learning about our impact on the planet is the first step towards doing something about it.

2

Lead by example

There are lots of small, everyday things you can do that will help tackle the climate emergency. Every action counts because together they add up to make a huge difference.

 

From reducing the amount of meat in your diet, to repairing household items, buying bamboo toilet roll, investing your money or pension in a climate-conscious way, or swapping four wheels for two - there are lots of ways you can be part of the solution.

Seemingly insignificant actions like these send a big signal to companies, suppliers, retailers, and the government about people's attitudes and behaviours , which can lead to changes in policy, products, and manufacturing.


Visit www.leedsbyexample.co.uk and www.52climateactions.com for inspiration and ideas.

3

Join the movement

There’s a growing movement of passionate people wanting to transform our city and there are many ways you can get involved:

 

If you have a little time:

 

If you want to be actively involved:

 

 

 

Give your time with Climate Action Leeds in your Community

 

Our 8 Community Hubs in Alwoodley, Armley, Beeston, Garforth, Horsforth, Little London, Otley and Seacroft are volunteer led. They do loads of great activities, from forest gardens to repair cafes and craftivist sessions.

 

You can give a little time, or a lot - just drop in or contact the hubs to see how you could help make things happen.

 

Give your time in other communities

 

There are environmental organisations across the city with loads of great opportunities. Check out Volunteer Centre Leeds or give your time with our Movement Building Team. Maybe you could be a citizen journalist, reporting on how the people of Leeds are fighting for Climate Justice?

4

Join the conversation, raise your voice

Having conversations with friends, family and within your different communities helps raise awareness, build connections, and makes a difference. Check out these useful tips on how to talk about climate change.

 

Individual action is only part of the story - systems need to change, and that requires political pressure. There are many ways you can have your voice heard by decision makers in Leeds and beyond.

  • Write to your local councillor
     

  • Leeds City Council’s Climate Emergency Advisory Committee has an open forum where citizens can speak directly to them - email climate.emergency@leeds.gov.uk to book a slot.   
     

  • Write to your MP and demand they take the actions that are needed:   www.theyworkforyou.com/mps

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Links we have used to other website's are not necessarily endorsements but are offered as starting points.

There is a lot of information online; some is reliable and true and some is unreliable and false.

 

It can be hard to know what to trust, so we encourage you to question sources of information and make your own judgements. If you're unsure, ask someone you trust what they think.

1. Learn
2. Lead
3. Join in
4. Talk
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